APA Blog

Category : Autism

Researchers Explore New Technologies to Help People with Autism

 Researchers are exploring new ways to use technology to help children and adults with autism. For example, the University of California’s MIND Institute has a targeted program, Autism, Community and Technology, that is working to help make autism services and treatments more accessible and affordable for families in need through technology.

Living with Autism: Journey to Adulthood

A new report from Drexel University highlights some of the challenges faced by many teens and young adults with autism. The 2018 National Autism Indicators Report presents an updated look at the characteristics and experiences of teens and young adults on the autism spectrum. More than three in four teens and young adults with autism were male. The report notes that high schoolers on the autism spectrum today are growing up at a time when awareness is increasing and expectations for full inclusion are changing.

Project SEARCH: Increasing Employment Opportunities for Young Adults with Autism

Landing your first full-time job can be challenging for anyone, but for people with autism it’s especially challenging. Two years after high school, more than half of young adults with autism are not employed, according to Autism Speaks. The Project SEARCH Transition-to-Work program aims to help improve the odds for employment for young people with autism.

Autism Often Accompanied by Other Conditions

People with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder often have a variety of co-occurring health and mental health conditions, such as gastrointestinal problems and ADHD. More than 95 percent of children with autism have at least one co-occurring disorder or condition, according to a recent study from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (1) More than half of the children studied (53 percent of 4-year-olds and 69 percent of 8-year-olds had four or more additional conditions.

Predicting Autism in Infants: Early Identification and Early Treatment

According to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in April this year, one in 59 children in the U.S. is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Autism is a very complex and variable condition. It is diagnosed based on observations of behavior in children as young as 2 years old, but it is often diagnosed much later. Interventions to treat autism symptoms are more effective the earlier they start, so identifying children earlier allows for starting treatment earlier, potentially lead to better outcomes.